Jack C. Davis Observatory

10th Anniversary Celebration Auction Items

  • Lagoon Lagoon The Lagoon Nebula is cloud of gas harboring star formation some 5,200 light years from Earth. The center of the nebula has a magenta tone because dust reflects some of the light from the bright stars combining blue reflection with red emission. This nebula is located in the Sagittarius Constellation.
    Size: 24x16
  • Rosette Rosette The Rosette Nebula is one of the largest nebulae in our galaxy, measuring 115 light-years across. This cloud of gas and dust is intrinsically three times as large as the Orion Nebula, but three times farther away at a distance of 4,900 light-years. A young star cluster is emerging from the Rosette Nebula with 100 stars spread across a half degree at the heart of the nebula. Collectively, the stars in the cluster are visible to the naked eye. Ultraviolet light from these central suns ionizes and excites the surrounding gas from which these stars were born.
    Size: 16x24
  • Horsehead Horsehead Horsehead and Flame Nebulae is found at a distance of 1,500 light-years from Earth and is related to the Great Orion Nebula. The dense dusk in the red emission part of the nebula forms the silhouette of a horse's head. The Flame Nebula is a region of glowing hydrogen gas in the shape of a burning bush. There is also some reflection nebula present. The brightest star in the image is Alnitak, which is the left star in the belt of Orion, the Hunter constellation.
    Size: 24x16
  • Pleiades Pleiades The Pleiades cluster contains 500 stars spread across a sphere 14 light-years wide at a distance of 400 light-years from Earth. Also known as the Seven Sisters in mythology, at least 7 stars can be seen with the naked eye. The nebulosity is cause when the light from the stars is reflected in a molecular cloud.
    Size: 24x16
  • Andromeda Andromeda The Andromeda Galaxy is the farthest object that most of us will ever see with the naked eye, at a distance of over 2 million light-years from us. Although is similar to our own Milky Way Galaxy it may be twice as large with hundreds of billions of stars. Two satellite galaxies are also shown in the image.
    Size: 24x16
  • The Moon and Jupiter The Moon and Jupiter This photo was taken when the Moon and Jupiter were in close proximity in the night sky. If you look closely you can see the banding on Jupiter and one of its moons.
    Size: 18x12
  • Composite image of the Annular Eclipse Annular Eclipse Composite Image The annular eclipse in May 2012 drew a large crowd to the Jack C. Davis In May, 2012. This photo is a composite of nine images showing the progress of the eclipse to totality.
    Size: 20x16
  • Orion Orion The Great Orion Nebula and the close neighbor the Running Man Nebula is a stellar nursery with stars emerging from clouds of hydrogen gas and dust. The Running Man nebula is a reflection nebula with clouds of dust reflecting the light of nearby stars. This nebula is found in the sword of Orion the Hunter in the Orion Constellation and is about 1,500 light years from Earth.
    Size: 16x24
  • Venus Transit Venus Transit The Venus transit has Venus passing between the Earth and the Sun. It was the last time this century when it occurred on June 6, 2012. The Sun was just setting behind the Sierra Mountain when the image was taken.
    Size: 16x16
  • Annular Eclipse from May 2012 Annular Eclipse from May 2012 This image represents the partial solar eclipse from May 2012, when the Sun was setting behind the Jack C. Davis Observatory.
    Size: 16x16
  • Jack C. Davis Observatory Jack C. Davis Observatory This image of the Jack C. Davis Observatory combines several images taken over 40 minutes and shows the apparent movement of the stars caused by the rotation of the Earth. The Orion Constellation was centered over the observatory that night.
    Size: 24x16
  • Flaming Star Nebula Flaming Star Nebula Flaming Star Nebula is part of a molecular cloud illuminated by the star AE Aurigae. This bright star is a transient visitor to the region after being ejected from the Orion Nebula by the collision of two binary star groups. Ultraviolet radiation from the star ionizes and excites hydrogen gas to glow red. A smaller region shines blue, due to the dust reflecting the starlight.
    Size: 16x20
  • Aurora Borealis Aurora Borealis The Aurora Borealis is a phenomenon seen on earth around the northern latitudes. Radiation from the Sun interacts with Earth's magnetic field and atmosphere to cause this spectacular light show.
    Size: 24x16
  • Witch Head Witch Head The faint Witch Head Nebula, 1,000 light-years distance, is composed of small dust grains reflecting the blue light from the nearby brilliant star Rigel.
    Size: 20x16
  • The moon and an airliner The moon and an airliner The Moon and an Airliner. A planned event? No. While learning to focus the camera with the telescope an airliner crossed the face of the moon creating this image. Didn't know the airliner was in the picture until seeing it on the computer.
    Size: 16x16
  • Quadruple Rosette Quadruple Rosette The Rosette Nebula is one of the largest nebulae in our galaxy, measuring 115 light-years across. This cloud of gas and dust is intrinsically three times as large as the Orion Nebula, but three times farther away at a distance of 4,900 light-years. A young star cluster is emerging from the Rosette Nebula with 100 stars spread across a half degree at the heart of the nebula. Collectively, the stars in the cluster are visible to the naked eye. Ultraviolet light from these central suns ionizes and excites the surrounding gas from which these stars were born.
    Size: 64x64 (Split into 4 equal 16x16 parts)
  • Aurora Borealis Double Float Top Image Aurora Borealis Double Float Top Image The Aurora Borealis is a phenomenon seen on earth around the northern latitudes. Radiation from the Sun interacts with Earth's magnetic field and atmosphere to cause this spectacular light show.
  • Aurora Borealis Double Float Bottom Image Aurora Borealis Double Float Bottom Image



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