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Jump Start Perspectives: Students Talk About Their Participation

Posted: March 28, 2017

Students Talk About Their Involvement with Jump Start

 

Jared Logan

Dayton High School senior Jared Logan has a head start on his college goals that wouldn’t have been possible without Western Nevada College’s Jump Start College.

Through Jump Start, Logan has earned dual credit during his final two years of high school. As a result, he will graduate from Dayton with an associate degree from WNC.

The Dayton High School senior has been accepted to attend Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

As he closes in on his associate degree, Logan admits that Jump Start has helped him mature, increased his confidence and made him realize that he has to study more to excel.

Logan also was proof that a Jump Start student can juggle a variety of high school activities while taking college courses. He played golf, ran cross country, played in the band and participated in Academic Team and the National Honor Society.

Logan recently reflected on his two-year participation in the Jump Start College and how it has impacted his life:

 

WNC: Why did you become part of the Jump Start College program?

 

JARED: I have always tried to push myself academically and this was the next step up that would help me get ahead of the game in college.

 

WNC: What was the biggest adjustment to becoming a college student while still in high school?

 

JARED: Suddenly, I discovered that a ”B” was no longer average like in high school. Instead, I had to really push myself in order to be successful in college classes.

 

WNC: How has Jump Start changed your study habits?

 

JARED: Previously, I didn’t need to study much to get good grades. That changed in college, where I had to put a lot more time into studying.

 

WNC: Does going away to college seem less intimidating or stressful since you have been taking college classes for nearly two years?

 

JARED: Not necessarily. My bigger concern has usually been being away from home. I felt confident I would do well in college classes. Jump Start just made me more reassured that I’ll do okay in college.

 

WNC: Do you participate in any sports or other extra-curricular activities at Dayton? If so, what are they?

 

JARED: I tried to do a lot of extra-curricular activities. For example, I did cross country, golf, Academic Team, National Honor Society and band. Having these extra-curricular activities was definitely harder with the more difficult classes, but I was glad I could still be a part of the high school.

 

WNC: Since you are on the verge of having two years of college completed before graduating from high school, how do you think that will change your future?

 

JARED: Studies show that having the two-year head start likely won’t make me finish college faster, but I hope that having an associate degree will help me to get a good job during college. This will make it easier to pay for school.

 

WNC: Looking back at Jump Start, how has it really impacted your life?

 

JARED: I think it has really helped me to mature, and given me a good idea of what to expect when I start taking classes at other colleges. It has also helped me to build my own confidence.

 

WNC: What advice would you give to current high school students considering Jump Start?

 

JARED: Don’t go into the Jump Start program expecting a high school class. You learn the difference very quickly, and it takes a lot more work to get good grades. You also have to understand that college is meant to help you in your future and you can’t try to just get by.

 

Oakley Workman 

 

Oakley Workman took advantage of Lyon County School’s participation in the Western Nevada Jump Start College program and is nearing his associate degree before graduating from Dayton High School this spring.

Workman has been accepted to attend Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

More than anything, the Dayton High senior appreciated the opportunity to be part of Western Nevada College’s Jump Start College and is very thankful to the people associated with the 3-year-old dual-credit program.

Workman recently reflected on his two-year participation in Jump Start and how it has influenced him for the better and made him develop as a student.

The Jump Start classes showed Workman that he truly needed to learn the material he was studying and not rely on memorizing from a book.

Here are Oakley’s responses to a Q&A about his experiences with the Jump Start program:

 

WNC: Why did you become part of the Jump Start College program?

 

OAKLEY: I became a part of the Jump Start program because I wanted to further my education. I was grateful that so many people worked as hard as they did to make this program a reality for high school students, and I felt that it was a great opportunity for me. I knew the curriculum would be rigorous, but I believed that even if I struggled, the skills and experience I gained would be worth it.

 

WNC: How has Jump Start changed your study habits?

 

OAKLEY: During the first semester of the program, my professors constantly stressed how important it was to take ownership of the material. I needed to study every day for each class, which I had not had to do previously. I also had to make the conscious decision to truly learn the things I was being taught, not just memorize what I needed to know for a particular quiz or exam.

 

WNC: Does going away to college seem less intimidating or stressful since you have been taking college classes for nearly two years?

 

OAKLEY: I am still very intimidated and stressed about my future plans.  However, I’m very grateful that I’ve had this opportunity to gain some more experience.

 

WNC: Do you participate in any sports or other extra-curricular activities at Dayton? If so, what are they?

 

OAKLEY: I do not currently participate in any sports at Dayton High School, but I am a member of the Dayton chapter of the National Honor Society and involved with the art program.

 

WNC: Since you are on the verge of having two years of college completed before graduating from high school, how do you think that will change your future?

 

OAKLEY: If everything goes according to my plan, I will begin working on my bachelor’s degree after I have returned from my two-year mission. I’m thankful for everything that I’ve learned from my two years of college, and I believe it will benefit me during my mission and beyond.  On the verge of having completed two years of college, I think that my future has been influenced for the better.

 

WNC: Looking back at Jump Start, how has it really impacted your life?

 

OAKLEY: My educational experience in the Jump Start program taught me about a range of subjects. But, more than that, I met people who impacted me and taught me things about myself. I believe I’ve grown as a student and hope that I’ve developed more as an individual.

 

WNC: What advice would you give to current high school students considering Jump Start?

 

OAKLEY: I would implore students to consider their own situation and weigh all aspects of the program. I hope that the students will decide what they want based on personal feelings and remember to approach things with an open mind.